THE TITLE AND DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF LAWS, (honoris causa) CONFERRED AT CONVOCATION, UBC OKANAGAN, JUNE 9, 2006

JEANNETTE ARMSTRONG

MR. CHANCELLOR, as one of Canada’s foremost Indigenous intellectual and literary figures, Jeannette Armstrong has been a tireless advocate for Indigenous rights and freedoms.

Ms. Armstrong is a writer, teacher, artist, and activist and is considered to be North America’s first Aboriginal woman novelist.

In 1979, Ms. Armstrong helped found the En’owkin Centre in Penticton, an Indigenous cultural, educational, ecological and creative arts post-secondary institution that practices and implements Indigenous knowledge and systems. In partnership with Okanagan University College and later, UBC Okanagan, she helped create and implement the Indigenous Studies program which offers perspectives of Indigenous people from the Okanagan, Canada and the world.

Her educational background includes a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the University of Victoria and a diploma of Fine Arts from Okanagan College. Ms. Armstrong received an Honorary Doctor of Letters from St. Thomas University and in 2003 was presented with the Buffet Award for Indigenous Leadership from Ecotrust, an organization based in Portland, Oregon.

While Ms. Armstrong serves her local community in so many ways, she is also known throughout the world as an advocate of justice for Indigenous people. She was appointed as one of seven Indigenous judges to the First Nations Court of Justice called by the Chiefs of Ontario and was appointed to the Council of Listeners in the International Testimonials on Violations of Indigenous Sovereignty for the United Nations. Ms. Armstrong currently serves on the Canadian Commission for UNESCO.

MR CHANCELLOR, for her outstanding contributions as a teacher, artist, and advocate for indigenous people around the world, I ask you to confer the degree of Doctor of Laws, honoris causa, to Jeannette Armstrong.

WILLIAM BOWERING

MR. CHANCELLOR, the current opportunities for post secondary education that exist in the Okanagan Valley are due to the vision and passion of a few individuals who saw the possibilities of what could truly be.

William Bowering is one such visionary. He is considered by many to be the architect of post-secondary education in the Okanagan Valley.

A UBC alumnus and former president of Okanagan University College, Dr. Bowering has been an instrumental figure in expanding and developing post-secondary education in the Okanagan during the past 28 years.

He played a key role in the transition of Okanagan College to Okanagan University College and was involved in introducing baccalaureate programs, expanding trades and technologies programs and building five regional campuses throughout the Valley. Dr. Bowering also initiated and successfully led OUC’s Bold Horizons Development campaign, raising $4.2 million for the construction of the North Kelowna Campus, now home to UBC Okanagan.

During his academic studies at UBC, Dr. Bowering completed a BA with First Class Honours in Chemistry and a Master of Science degree in Chemistry. He later earned Ph.D.’s in Chemistry from both McGill and Cambridge. In 1993, Dr. Bowering received an honorary degree from Ritsumeikan University in Japan.

Throughout his career, Dr. Bowering was considered a dedicated scholar, a gentleman, a patron of the arts, a visionary leader and a friend to the communities he served. Now retired, he is still very active in his community. He has served as the President of the Okanagan Symphony and is currently working on ensuring the preservation of Knox Mountain Park.

MR. CHANCELLOR, for his leadership and service to post secondary education and the people of the Okanagan Valley, I ask you to confer the degree of Doctor of Laws, honoris causa, upon William Bowering.


THE TITLE AND DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF LAWS, (honoris causa) CONFERRED AT CONVOCATION, UBC OKANAGAN, JUNE 8, 2007

TOM SIDDON

MR. CHANCELLOR, as an accomplished minister of the Crown, academic researcher and teacher, and science innovator, the Honorable Thomas Edward Siddon, P.C., has served Canada with distinction in public and private life.

Dr. Siddon earned Bachelor of Science degree with distinction in mechanical engineering from the University of Alberta. He went on to earn a Master of Applied Science degree and a Ph.D. in aeronautical noise, turbulence and acoustics from the University of Toronto. He conducted research and was a professor of mechanical engineering at UBC between 1969 and 1978.

First elected to Parliament in 1978, Dr. Siddon was a Member of Parliament for 15 years, with nine years' service as Minister of State for Science and Technology, Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, and Minister of National Defence.

His achievements in public office are many. They include establishing the foundation for the Canadian Space Agency and signing the International Space Station Agreement with the United States in 1984, as Minister of State for Science and Technology.

As Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Dr. Siddon negotiated and signed the Nunavut Agreement-in-Principle and later the Nunavut Final Agreement which provided for the creation of that Canadian territory.

After leaving elected office, he volunteered his time and expertise with the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business, the Atlantic Council of Canada, and the Canadian Council for Service Organization.

Now semi-retired, Dr. Siddon continues to serve his community as Chair of the Okanagan Water Stewardship Committee, and as a director of the Okanagan Partnership.

MR. CHANCELLOR, for his leadership and service to the people of the Okanagan, British Columbia, and Canada, I ask you to confer the degree of Doctor of Laws, honoris causa, upon Thomas Edward Siddon.

Read his acceptance speech


THE TITLE AND DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF SCIENCE, (honoris causa) CONFERRED AT CONVOCATION, UBC OKANAGAN, JUNE 6, 2008

BRYAN KOLB

MR. VICE-CHANCELLOR: Dr. Bryan Kolb is a Canadian pioneer in the world of neuroscience. A founding researcher with the Canadian Centre for Behavioural Neuroscience, Dr. Kolb has become one of the most influential neuroscientists, and his work is studied around the world.

Among his many discoveries and achievements, Dr. Kolb was the first to show how the growth of new brain cells can restore psychological and behavioural function. He and his team have discovered that we have the power to grow new brain cells. His research has spurred new treatments to help victims of stroke, those living with Alzheimer’s Disease, or afflicted by drug abuse or head injuries.

He developed one of the first courses in human neuropsychology in Canada, and co-authored the premier academic text in that field. Prior to the 1970s, Canadian neuroscience focused on animal physiology. As a young post-doctoral fellow, Dr. Kolb offered to develop and teach a course in human neuropsychology. His colleagues at the Montreal Neurological Institute suggested the course would not be very popular – and if fewer than 12 students enrolled, the new course would be cancelled.The future of neuropsychology and behavioural neuroscience was changed when 275 students enrolled in that first course.

Dr. Kolb received his Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State University in 1973. He conducted post-doctoral work at the University of Western Ontario and the Montreal Neurological Institute. He moved to the University of Lethbridge in 1976, where he is currently a Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience.

Dr. Kolb is a Killam Fellow, and a Fellow of the Canadian Psychological Association, the American Psychological Association, the American Psychological Society, and the Royal Society of Canada. He is a recipient of the Hebb Prize from the Canadian Psychological Association, and is a former president of the Canadian Society for Brain, Behaviour, and Cognitive Science.

Mr. Vice-Chancellor, for his leadership in unlocking the secrets of the brain, and in recognition of his unmatched contributions to the advancement of neuroscience, I ask you to confer the degree of Doctor of Science, honoris causa, upon DR. BRYAN KOLB.


THE TITLE AND DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF LETTERS, (honoris causa) CONFERRED AT CONVOCATION, UBC OKANAGAN, JUNE 5, 2009

LISA STEELE & KIM TOMCZAK

MADAME CHANCELLOR: Lisa Steele and Kim Tomczak are two of Canada’s foremost video and new media artists.

Both are professors at the University of Toronto, and are recognized around the world for innovative artistic achievements spanning more than three decades. Through their art and their work together, they have made an enormous contribution to Canadian art, and are applauded here at home for their commitment to art education and Canada’s video art community. Among their many major awards, in 2005 they received the Governor General's Award for Visual and Media Arts.

Their work can be found in the National Gallery of Canada, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston, and many more of the world's great art collections.

Among their influential endeavours, in 1980 they founded Vtape, an artist-run distribution centre for video art to promote the growth of the video medium as a recognized art form.

The expansion of visual arts programs at universities across Canada to include video and new media is, in large part, due to their pioneering activities with video art and their long-time commitment to arts education.

Their ongoing commitment to their artistic practice has established them as international artists of the highest regard and leaders in the field. Through their efforts as curators, they have advanced the work of emerging and established video and new media artists, and through their substantial critical writing in the field, they have contributed to the development of video and new media in Canada and around the world.

Madame Chancellor, for their contributions to arts education and efforts in raising the profile of video art at the national and international levels, I ask you to confer the degree of Doctor of Letters, honoris causa, upon LISA STEELE AND KIM TOMCZAK.

THE TITLE AND DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF LAWS, (honoris causa) CONFERRED AT CONVOCATION, UBC OKANAGAN, JUNE 5, 2009

J. PETER MEEKISON

MADAME CHANCELLOR: Dr. J. Peter Meekison has served his province and his country with great distinction. He has enjoyed a diverse and esteemed career in law, as a university professor, government administrator, and a leader in public service.

He is a pre-eminent political scientist, constitutional scholar and public administrator and is widely known as the dean of Canadian federalism. An expert on Canadian federal-provincial relations and constitutional policy, he was the author of a proposal for the constitutional amending formula that was incorporated into Canada’s Constitution Act of 1981.

Among his many major awards, he was made an Officer in the Order of Canada in 1986, and is a recipient of the Lieutenant Governor's Medal for Excellence in Public Administration from the Province of Alberta.

He served as Vice President, Academic, at the University of Alberta in the mid-1980s, and was involved on behalf of the Alberta government in both the 1987 Meech Lake Accord discussions and the 1992 Charlottetown Accord process.

In 1993, Dr. Meekison was appointed to the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples. The five-volume report prepared by the commission is considered one of the most significant and extensive studies ever undertaken of the issues, challenges and opportunities facing Canada’s Aboriginal population.

Appointed to serve as public administrator for Okanagan University College, in 2004 and 2005 he oversaw the transition of that institution into two new post-secondary institutions -- Okanagan College and UBC Okanagan.

He is an adjunct professor at the University of Victoria, and continues to make outstanding contributions to the advancement of public policy in Alberta and Canada, and is truly a great Canadian.

Madame Chancellor, for his contributions to Canadian federalism and dedicated service in the advancement of post-secondary education in Canada, I ask you to confer the degree of Doctor of Laws, honoris causa, upon J. PETER MEEKISON.

Read his acceptance speech


THE TITLE AND DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF LAWS, (honoris causa) CONFERRED AT CONVOCATION, UBC OKANAGAN, JUNE 11, 2010

SAMANTHA NUTT

MADAM CHANCELLOR: Dr. Samantha Nutt is the founder and executive director of the humanitarian organization War Child Canada, and a medical doctor specializing in maternal and child health in zones of armed conflict, family medicine, public health, refugee health and women's health.

Over the course of her professional career and through her work with War Child Canada, Dr. Nutt has spearheaded efforts to provide direct humanitarian support for the world's war-affected children.

Her passion for advocacy emerged from her years living and working in areas of conflict, such as Somalia, Liberia, Burundi and Iraq. Even as a 24-year-old experiencing a war zone for the first time in Somalia, Dr. Nutt realized the need for an organization that would advocate and create change for children, and that could move beyond the normal concept of charity.

By the time she was 28 she had brought together the partners and resources necessary to establish War Child Canada. This organization has effected change directly, immediately and without compromise, providing long-term programming for war-affected children and their families, and promoting greater awareness in Canada concerning the rights of children everywhere.

Dr. Nutt graduated Summa Cum Laude from McMaster University, earned a Master of Science degree with distinction from London University, and holds a Fellowship in Community Medicine from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. She is on staff at Sunnybrook and Women's Health Science Centre and is an assistant professor at the University of Toronto in the Department of Family and Community Medicine.

Known for inspiring others to make a difference in the lives of those affected by war, she works with the United Nations and non-governmental organizations around the world.

Madam Chancellor, for her humanitarian leadership in Canada and around the world, and in particular her dedication to the plight of children in the world's war zones, I ask you to confer the degree of Doctor of Laws, honoris causa, upon SAMANTHA JOAN NUTT.


THE TITLE AND DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF LAWS, (honoris causa) CONFERRED AT CONVOCATION, UBC OKANAGAN, JUNE 9, 2011

BRAD BENNETT

Madam Chancellor,

Brad Bennett has earned a distinguished place in UBC's long and proud history.

The University of British Columbia created the Okanagan campus in 2005. This historic and transformative expansion -- just six short years ago -- was made possible by the thoughtful and steadfast leadership provided by Mr. Bennett, who chaired UBC's Board of Governors for half a decade, from 2005 to 2010, through some of the most challenging economic turbulence -- and exciting eras of growth and opportunity -- we have known.

Mr. Bennett has a long and distinguished record of leadership in business and higher education in British Columbia, and has continued a strong family tradition by serving his community and his province in many capacities.

Since 1990, Mr. Bennett has been the president of McIntosh Properties Ltd., a real estate investment and holding company. He is a director of the Premier’s Technology Council, UBC Properties Trust Board, a trustee and member of the Executive Advisory Board of the Fraser Institute, and a member of the BC Business Laureates Hall of Fame Cabinet.

Truly a visionary leader and community builder, Mr. Bennett is a recipient of the Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal, and the Honorary Alumni Award from UBC. In October 2010, Mr. Bennett was awarded the Order of British Columbia.

Madam Chancellor, for his commitment to British Columbia in business and community service, and in particular for his outstanding dedication to post-secondary education and leadership at the University of British Columbia, I ask you to confer the degree of Doctor of Laws, honoris causa, upon BRAD BENNETT.


THE TITLE AND DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF LAWS, (honoris causa) CONFERRED AT CONVOCATION, UBC OKANAGAN, JUNE 7, 2012

D. ROSS FITZPATRICK

Madam Chancellor,

From California gold to extraordinary Okanagan wine, there simply isn't much that the Honourable D. Ross Fitzpatrick has not pursued with a passion in his incomparable career as an entrepreneur.

He is a visionary business leader, a champion of agriculture and the environment, and a pioneer in British Columbia's burgeoning wine industry. In addition to these extraordinary accomplishments, he served our nation on the Senate of Canada, representing the Okanagan-Similkameen from 1998 to 2008.

Ross Fitzpatrick was born to a pioneer Okanagan agricultural family, and he and his family continue to reside in the Okanagan. We are extremely proud to point out -- often -- that Mr. Fitzpatrick is one of our own: a distinguished alumnus of UBC.

Upon graduation from UBC in 1958 with a Bachelor of Commerce and Business Administration degree, he served as researcher to the Royal Commission on the Tree Fruit Industry of British Columbia. He later pursued graduate studies at the University of Maryland and Columbia University in New York, and embarked on what would become a celebrated career founding companies in North America's aerospace, oil and gas, and mining industries.

And that's where California gold comes in. Mr. Fitzpatrick was instrumental in developing California's Castle Mountain Mine, which earned the prestigious "Health of the Land" award for its commitment to protecting environmental resources. This is just one illustration of the extraordinary commitment to the environment for which Mr. Fitzpatrick has been so deservedly recognized throughout his career. He has worked tirelessly to protect the environment, promote green economic development and to contribute to the public and community's well-being.

In 1986, he returned to the Okanagan to promote value-added agriculture and founded CedarCreek Estate Winery. He pioneered the planting of vinifera grapes to produce premium quality wines in the Okanagan.

He has received numerous awards for his work, including the Order of British Columbia in 2009, Freedom of the City of Kelowna, the Queen Elizabeth the Second Golden Jubilee Medal, Freedom of the City of Oliver, and the Canadian Confederation Medal.

Madam Chancellor, for his extraordinary contributions to this county, his leadership in industry and economic development, and his commitment to environmental stewardship, I ask you to confer the degree of Doctor of Laws, honoris causa, upon D. Ross Fitzpatrick.

Read his acceptance speech


THE TITLE AND DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF LETTERS, (honoris causa) CONFERRED AT CONVOCATION, UBC OKANAGAN, JUNE 6, 2013

PATRICK LANE

MADAM CHANCELLOR: It is in the context of this university's highest values -- the pursuit of excellence, free inquiry and the enhancement of society -- that I am honoured to cite the contributions of Patrick Lane, one of Canada's finest poets. Mr. Lane's career over the past 50 years has been a deeply personal journey, but one he has shared widely through his prolific and profound work.

Mr. Lane brings to the page an extremely rare combination of incisive observation, bold honesty, and an extraordinary facility with language that gives readers new, sometimes humbling and often challenging, ways to appreciate the human condition and the natural world around us.

Mr. Lane has published more than 27 books of poetry, a book of short stories, and a memoir about his fight with alcohol and drug addiction. Among his great achievements is the highly acclaimed novel Red Dog, Red Dog, set right here in the Okanagan.

After graduating from high school in Vernon, BC, Mr. Lane tried his hand at several jobs -- including logging and truck driving -- before he chose a career in poetry. He has travelled extensively, and lived in various parts of Canada, finally settling on Vancouver Island with his wife Lorna Crozier, also an award-winning Canadian poet.

He has earned many of Canada’s major literary awards for poetry, including the Governor General’s Award, the Canadian Authors’ Association Award, and the CBC National Prize for Poetry. In 2007 he received British Columbia’s highest literary honour, the Lieutenant Governor’s Award for Literary Excellence.

Mr. Lane is known as a brilliant teacher and a tireless mentor, nurturing new writers. For the past 20 years, he has offered master classes for poets, led writing workshops, and he has taught or served as writer-in-residence at many universities across Canada.

Madam Chancellor, for his significant contributions to the literary life of Canada, I ask you to confer the degree of Doctor of Letters, honoris causa, upon PATRICK LANE.

Read his acceptance speech


THE TITLE AND DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF LETTERS, (honoris causa) CONFERRED AT CONVOCATION, UBC OKANAGAN, JUNE 7, 2013

EDWARD BURTYNSKY

MADAM CHANCELLOR: This university engages in reflection and action to build understanding across cultures, and to enrich our intellectual and social lives. Edward Burtynsky does this in full measure through his extraordinary photography. It is an honour to cite the works of a gifted photographer who has given us such unique, indelible images that remind us of the impact our human existence has on the world.

Mr. Burtynsky's photography explores the intricate link between industry and nature, combining the raw elements of mining, manufacturing, shipping, oil production and recycling into eloquent, highly expressive visions that find beauty and humanity in the most unlikely of places.

Born in 1955 in St. Catharine’s, Ontario, a town dependent on auto assembly, he grew up in a heavily industrial yet picturesque part of the country. He started taking pictures at age 11, shortly after his father purchased a used camera and some darkroom equipment.

He earned his degree in photography from Ryerson University, and studied graphic art at Niagara College. He has taken his photography skills around the world, winning international acclaim for his imagery of manufacturing processes and industrial activities.

His remarkable large-format photographic depictions of global industrial landscapes are included in the collections of over fifty major museums around the world, including the National Gallery of Canada, the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Guggenheim Museum in New York.

In 2006, Mr. Burtynsky became an Officer of the Order of Canada. In 2010, he received the Award in Contemporary Art from the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art in Toronto. And he has been active since the mid-1980s in helping others refine and advance their art through Toronto Image Works, and is an active supporter of the Toronto International Photography Festival, the Ryerson Gallery and Research Centre, and
numerous other organizations.

Madam Chancellor, for his extraordinary contributions to Canada and the world through the art of photography, I ask you to confer the degree of Doctor of Letters, honoris causa, upon EDWARD BURTYNSKY.


THE TITLE AND DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF SCIENCE, (honoris causa) CONFERRED AT CONVOCATION, UBC OKANAGAN, JUNE 6, 2014

JACK SZOSTAK

MISTER VICE-CHANCELLOR: Long, long before he received a Nobel Prize, and before he earned a Ph.D. in biochemistry, and even before he started university at the age of 15, Jack Szostak was a curious kid with a chemistry set.

The University of British Columbia values lifelong learning and the pursuit of our passions -- particularly when that pursuit can have a transformative impact on the world. That must have been one remarkable chemistry set. And we know that inquisitive lad was one remarkable and eager young learner.

His ground-breaking explorations in cell biology and genetics have had a profound effect across the life sciences. Indeed, they have changed our understanding of life itself.

Among his many achievements is the discovery that cells build and maintain telomeres, the protective caps at the tips of chromosomes, by using a special DNA synthesizing enzyme now known as telomerase.

Understanding telomerase is one key to understanding how cells and organisms age. It’s critical to understanding the biology of cancer cells, for example, and has given us a more complete view of the processes that affect our lifespans.

In 2009, recognizing his exceptional work in this field, Dr. Szostak received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, along with research colleagues Elizabeth Blackburn and Carol Greider.

Dr. Szostak was born in 1952 in the United Kingdom and grew up in Canada. He studied at McGill University in Montreal and at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, where he received his PhD in 1977.

He has been at Harvard Medical School since 1979 and is currently professor of genetics there, and professor of chemistry and chemical biology at Harvard University. He is also affiliated with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

His contributions at the forefront of science continue as he and his research team today explore the molecular origins of life -- seeking to understand how complex chemicals on a very young planet Earth were able to self-assemble and combine to form simple organisms capable of reproducing and evolving.

Mister Vice-Chancellor, for his extraordinary contributions to our understanding of life, I ask you to confer the degree of Doctor of Science, honoris causa, upon JACK W. SZOSTAK.


THE TITLE AND DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF SCIENCE, (honoris causa) CONFERRED AT CONVOCATION, UBC OKANAGAN, JUNE 4, 2015

SARA SEAGER

MISTER CHANCELLOR, Sara Seager is a Canadian-American astronomer and planetary scientist whose research focuses on theory, computation, and data analysis of planets orbiting stars far from our own solar system.

She has introduced many new ideas to the field of exoplanet characterization, including work that led to the first detection of an exoplanet atmosphere.

Dr. Seager was also part of a team that co-discovered the first detection of light emitted from an exoplanet and she introduced many of the concepts on which the field of exoplanet atmospheres is now based. She is the author of two textbooks on these topics.

Born in Toronto, she earned a Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics and physics from the University of Toronto and a Ph.D. in astronomy from Harvard University in 1999. She held a post-doctoral research fellow position at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, and was a senior research staff member at the Carnegie Institution of Washington through 2006. She joined the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2007 where she is now Professor of Physics and the Class of 1941 Professor of Planetary Science.

In 2013, Dr. Seager was awarded a prestigious MacArthur Fellowship, sometimes referred to as a “genius grant,” for her work on detecting chemical signatures in exoplanet atmospheres and developing low-cost space observatories to observe planetary transits.

Other awards and honours include election to the US National Academy of Sciences in 2015, the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Prize in the Physical Sciences, the American Astronomical Society's Helen B. Warner Prize, and a lifetime honorary membership in the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada.

Mister Chancellor, in recognition of her significant contributions to science and our understanding of planets across interstellar space, I ask you to confer the degree Doctor of Science, honoris causa, upon SARA SEAGER.


THE TITLE AND DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF SCIENCE, (honoris causa) CONFERRED AT CONVOCATION, UBC OKANAGAN, JUNE 5, 2015

PHILIP J. CURRIE

MISTER CHANCELLOR, Philip John Currie has served as a seminal force in developing Canada’s reputation for excellence in palaeontology and is an inspiring mentor for up-and-coming Canadian scientists.

His accomplishments have led to a greater understanding of dinosaurs, particularly Therapods such as Tyrannasaurids and their scientific significance, and did much to establish the link between birds and dinosaurs. Dr. Currie helped found the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology in Drumheller, Alberta. He also served as Co-director of the Canada-China Dinosaur Project in 1986 and was Curator of Earth Sciences at the Provincial Museum of Alberta.

Dr. Currie received his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Toronto, a Master of Science from McGill University, followed by a Ph.D. in Biology (with distinction) in 1981. He is currently Professor and Canada Research Chair in Dinosaur Paleobiology at the University of Alberta.

Over the past 25 years he has worked on fossil recovery projects in Mongolia, Argentina, Australia, Dinosaur Provincial Park, and many other locations. Together with colleagues he has named 25 new dinosaurs and other fossil reptiles, and three have been named in his honour.

Dr. Currie has received many honours and awards, including the Outstanding Leadership in Alberta Science Award, the Canadian Museums Association Award for Distinguished Service, and the Michael Smith Award for Science Promotion from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. He is a Fellow of both the Royal Canadian Geographic Society and the Royal Society of Canada.

In 2010, he was awarded the Alberta Order of Excellence, and in 2012, the Royal Canadian Geographical Society's Gold Medal.

Mister Chancellor, in recognition of his outstanding contributions to the field of paleontology, I ask that you confer the degree of Doctor of Science, honoris causa, upon PHILIP J. CURRIE.


THE TITLE AND DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF SCIENCE, (honoris causa) CONFERRED AT CONVOCATION, UBC OKANAGAN, JUNE 5, 2015

ROBERTA BONDAR

MISTER CHANCELLOR, as an astronaut aboard NASA’s Space Shuttle Discovery in 1992, Dr. Roberta Lynn Bondar orbited Earth 129 times in eight days and travelled more than 4.7 million kilometers. During that mission, she conducted over 40 investigations from 13 countries, including Space Physiology Experiments from UBC, and made history as the first Canadian female astronaut and the world’s first neurologist in space.

Dr. Bondar has inspired generations of future scientists, doctors, teachers and people who dare to dream, train and achieve great things. She is a creative thinker, physician and scientist, photographer and author, environmental interpreter, an educator and pioneering astronaut, and a truly “passionate Earthling.”

A Canadian board-certified neurologist with a subspecialty in neuro-ophthalmology, Dr. Bondar has made ground-breaking discoveries in space medicine. For more than a decade she headed an international research team studying the effects on astronauts of spaceflight and re-adaptation back to Earth's gravity.

One of the most academically distinguished astronauts to have flown in space, Dr. Bondar is also an acclaimed photographer of the environment whose in-flight role as part of NASA’s Earth Observation Team included photographing planet Earth.

She is the author of three best-selling photo essay books featuring her photography of the surface of Earth, and her photographic works are in private, corporate and institutional collections in Canada, the United States and England. She co-founded The Roberta Bondar Foundation, a not-for-profit charitable organization, to reconnect us to the natural environment.

Dr. Bondar was born in Sault Sainte Marie, Ontario, and studied zoology and agriculture at the University of Guelph. She completed a Master of Science in experimental pathology at the University of Western Ontario before earning a Ph.D. in neurobiology from the University of Toronto, and an M.D. from McMaster University.

An Officer of the Order of Canada and holder of the NASA Space Medal, Dr. Bondar was inducted into the International Women’s Forum Hall of Fame and Canadian Medical Hall of Fame for her research. She is also a fellow of both the Royal Society of Canada and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Mr. Chancellor, in recognition of her extraordinary and inspiring contributions to science, and lifelong passion for learning and sharing knowledge, I ask that you confer the degree of Doctor of Science, honoris causa, upon Dr. ROBERTA LYNN BONDAR.


THE TITLE AND DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF SCIENCE, (honoris causa) CONFERRED AT CONVOCATION, UBC OKANAGAN, JUNE 5, 2015

DAVID SCHINDLER

MISTER CHANCELLOR, Dr. David William Schindler is a scientist known internationally as a leader in protecting freshwater resources here in Canada and around the world.

His research on the environmental effects of pollutants and climate change have shaped freshwater management policies, including the regulation of nutrients and addressing acid rain in North America and Europe.

Dr. Schindler earned a degree in zoology from North Dakota State University in 1962 then studied aquatic ecology at Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar. Working under Charles Sutherland Elton -- one of the founders of ecology and founder of Oxford University’s Bureau of Animal Population -- Dr. Schindler began formulating an interdisciplinary ecosystem approach to limnology and ecology.

After earning his doctorate he took a position as Assistant Professor at Trent University in Peterborough, Ontario.  In 1968, he was made founding project leader of the Fisheries Research Board of Canada’s Experimental Lakes Project and began innovative large-scale experiments that would reveal serious changes taking place in Canada’s lakes.

Dr. Schindler has received numerous prestigious international awards including the first Stockholm Water Prize, the Volvo International Environmental Prize, the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement, and the G.E. Hutchinson Medal of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography.

He has also received several national awards, including Canada’s highest honour for Science and Engineering, the Gerhard Herzberg Gold Medal of Science and Engineering, the Manning Award of Distinction for Innovation in Science and the Killam Prize from the Canada Council for the Arts.

He is an Officer of the Order of Canada, a Fellow of the Royal Societies of Canada and London, a foreign fellow of the Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences, and a member of the U. S. National Academy of Sciences.

Mr. Chancellor, in recognition of his extraordinary contributions to science and his work to care for the world’s most precious natural resources, I ask that you confer the degree of Doctor of Science, honoris causa, upon Dr. DAVID WILLIAM SCHINDLER.